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1960s R&B song stubs

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  1. Hit The Road Jack

    Hit The Road Jack (1961)

    1,363 views

    "Hit the Road Jack" is a song written by rhythm and bluesman Percy Mayfield and first recorded in 1960 as an a capella demo sent to Art Rupe, available on the Memory Pain CD vol. 2, Specialty Records SPCD-7027-2. It became famous after it was recorded by singer-pianist Ray Charles. It hit number one for two weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, beginning on Monday, October 9, 1961. The song was also number one on the R&B Sides chart for five weeks, becoming Ray Charles' sixth number one on that chart. The song is ranked #377 on the Rolling Stone magazine's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It was the theme song from the sitcom Unhappily Ever After from season 1 to 5.


  2. Funny How Time Slips Away

    Funny How Time Slips Away (1962)

    867 views

    "Funny How Time Slips Away" is a song written by Willie Nelson and first recorded by country singer Billy Walker. Walker's version peaked at #23 on the Hot C&W Sides chart.


  3. Unchain My Heart

    Unchain My Heart (1962)

    725 views

    "Unchain My Heart" is a song written by Bobby Sharp (1924-2013) and recorded first in 1961 by Ray Charles and in 1963 by Trini Lopez and later by many others. Sharp, a drug addict at the time, sold the song to Teddy Powell for $50. Powell demanded half the songwriting credit. Sharp later successfully fought for the rights to his song. In 1987, he was also able to renew the copyright for his publishing company, B. Sharp Music.


  4. You're My Everything

    You're My Everything (1967)

    693 views

    "You're My Everything" is a 1967 hit single recorded by The Temptations for the Gordy (Motown) label. It is the first of three singles (and four songs) to be co-written for the group by Motown songwriter Roger Penzabene. It reached number three on the U.S. R&B chart and number six on the U.S. Pop chart. It would be the third single from the group's 1967 album The Temptations with a Lot o' Soul.


  5. Without Love

    Without Love (1969)

    588 views

    "Without Love (There is Nothing)" is a song written by Danny Small and originally recorded by Clyde McPhatter in 1957. McPhatter's version peaked at number six on the R&B Best Seller chart and number nineteen on Billboard Hot 100.


  6. Ain't It Funky Now?

    Ain't It Funky Now? (1971)

    587 views

    "Ain't it Funky Now" is a funk instrumental by James Brown. Released as a two-part single in 1969, it charted #3 R&B and #24 Pop. It also appeared on the 1970 album Ain't It Funky.


  7. Ain't That Peculiar

    Ain't That Peculiar (1965)

    491 views

    "Ain't That Peculiar" is a 1965 song recorded by American soul musician Marvin Gaye for the Tamla (Motown) label. The single was produced by Smokey Robinson, and written by Robinson, and fellow Miracles members Ronald White, Pete Moore, and Marv Tarplin. "Ain't That Peculiar" features Gaye, with The Andantes on backing vocals, singing about the torment of a painful relationship.


  8. Papa's Got A Brand New Bag

    Papa's Got A Brand New Bag (1970)

    427 views

    "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag" is a song written and recorded by James Brown. It was released as a two-part single in 1965, and is considered seminal in the musical genre of funk.


  9. Paradise

    Paradise (1962)

    409 views

    "Paradise" is a 1962 single by The Temptations for the Gordy label. The single is notable for being The Temptations' first charting single on the Billboard Pop charts. However, it was not their first on the Hot 100 (that honor would go to the group’s later single, The Way You Do the Things You Do), instead it charted at 22 on the Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100 charts.


  10. I Was Made to Love Her

    I Was Made to Love Her (1967)

    394 views

    "I Was Made to Love Her" is a hit single recorded by American soul musician Stevie Wonder for Motown's Tamla label in 1967 (see 1967 in music). The song was written by Wonder, his mother Lula Mae Hardaway, Sylvia Moy and producer Henry Cosby; and included on Wonder's 1967 album I Was Made to Love Her. Released as a single, "I Was Made to Love Her" peaked at number-two on the Billboard Pop Singles chart and spent four non-consecutive weeks at number-one on the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles chart in the United States. When asked in a 1968 interview which of his songs stood out in his mind, Wonder answered "I Was Made to Love Her because it's a true song." The song features Wonder's harmonica solo in the introduction. The song also features strings following the bridge section. The last lyric line "You know Stevie won't ever leave you", refers to the singer himself.


  11. That's The Way Love Is

    That's The Way Love Is (1969)

    373 views

    "That's the Way Love Is" is a 1967 Tamla (Motown) single recorded by The Isley Brothers and produced by Norman Whitfield, later covered in a 1969 hit version by Marvin Gaye.


  12. Maybe The Last Time

    Maybe The Last Time (1965)

    368 views

    "Maybe the Last Time" is a song written by James Brown (under the pseudonym Ted Wright) and recorded by Brown and The Famous Flames in 1964. It was released as the B-side of "Out of Sight" and was also included on the Out of Sight album. Brown described it as "a heavy gospel-based number, all about appreciating friends and everything while you can because each time you see somebody may be the last time, you don't know." It was the last studio recording Brown made with The Famous Flames, although the singing group continued to perform live with him for several more years.


  13. Down In The Valley

    Down In The Valley (1965)

    364 views

    "Down in the Valley" is a 1962 R&B song written by Bert Berns and Solomon Burke and originally recorded by Solomon Burke. It was released on Atlantic as a B-side to "I'm Hanging Up My Heart For You". It was covered by Otis Redding on his album Otis Blue. Burke's original version is a classic example of early country soul with booming vocals and a dramatic approach.


  14. Please Return Your Love to Me

    Please Return Your Love to Me (1968)

    357 views

    "Please Return Your Love to Me" is a 1968 hit single by The Temptations for the Gordy (Motown) label. Produced by Norman Whitfield, who co-written the song with Barrett Strong, it is the last single to feature David Ruffin in the lineup (he was singing in the background). With Eddie Kendricks singing lead, it peaked on the Billboard Hot 100 Pop charts in the Top 30 at number 26, and number 4 on the Billboard R&B Singles charts.


  15. There Was A Time

    There Was A Time (1967)

    354 views

    "There Was a Time" is a song written and performed by James Brown.


  16. If I Could Build My Whole World Around You

    If I Could Build My Whole World Around You (1974)

    317 views

    "If I Could Build My Whole World Around You" is a popular song recorded by Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell in 1967 and released in December 1967. Written by Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, and Vernon Bullock, the single was Gaye & Terrell's third single together and the second to go Top Ten on both the Pop and R&B charts of Billboard, peaking at number ten and number two, respectively.


  17. The Girl's Alright with Me

    The Girl's Alright with Me (1964)

    313 views

    "The Girl's Alright with Me" is a 1964 song recorded by The Temptations for the Gordy (Motown) label. The B-side to their Top 40 hit "I'll Be in Trouble", the song was also able to chart on its own, peaking at number 102 on Billboard Pop Charts. It was written by Eddie Kendricks, Norman Whitfield, and Eddie Holland, and produced by Whitfield.


  18. Oh, Mother of Mine

    Oh, Mother of Mine (1961)

    288 views

    "Oh Mother of Mine" is a 1961 song that was released as a Miracle label single by Motown singing group The Temptations. It was the group's debut single for Motown, after signing with them in January of that year.


  19. If This World Were Mine

    If This World Were Mine (1974)

    263 views

    "If This World Were Mine" is a 1967 song by soul music duo Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell from their album United. Written solely by Gaye, it was one of the few songs they recorded without Ashford & Simpson writing or producing. When it was released as a single in November 1967 as the B-side to the duo's "If I Could Build My Whole World Around You", it hit the Billboard pop singles chart, peaking at number sixty-eight, and peaked at number twenty-seven on the Billboard R&B singles chart. Gaye would later put the song into his set list during his last tours in the early-1980s as he performed a medley of his hits with Terrell. The song was covered a year later by Joe Bataan on the 1968 Fania Allstars LP Live at the Red Garter, Vol. 2, and in 1969 by Ambrose Slade (pre-Slade) on their album Beginnings.


  20. There Goes My Baby

    There Goes My Baby (1987)

    253 views

    "There Goes My Baby" is a song written by Ben E. King (Benjamin Nelson), Lover Patterson, George Treadwell, Jerry Leiber, and Mike Stoller, and produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller for The Drifters. This was the first single by the second incarnation of the Drifters (previously known as the 5 Crowns), who assumed the group name in 1958 after manager George Treadwell fired the remaining members of the original lineup.


  21. Mr. Pitiful

    Mr. Pitiful (1965)

    233 views

    "Mr. Pitiful" is a song written by Otis Redding and Steve Cropper which was on the 1965 album The Great Otis Redding Sings Soul Ballads.


  22. The Door Is Still Open To My Heart

    The Door Is Still Open To My Heart (1964)

    220 views

    "The Door Is Still Open to My Heart" is a 1955 song written by Chuck Willis and originally performed by the Baltimore-based R&B vocal group, The Cardinals. In the US, the original version peaked at number four on the R&B playlist and number ten in R&B sales charts.


  23. I Got The Feelin'

    I Got The Feelin' (1970)

    216 views

    "I Got the Feelin'" is a funk song by James Brown. Released as a single in 1968, it reached #1 on the R&B chart and #6 on the pop chart. It also appeared on a 1968 album of the same name.


  24. Bring It Up

    Bring It Up (1966)

    195 views

    "Bring It Up", also known as "Bring It Up (Hipster's Avenue)", is a song recorded by James Brown. It was released as a single in 1967 and charted #7 R&B and #29 Pop. It also appeared on the album Sings Raw Soul. An unedited version of the song was released on the 1991 box set Star Time.


  25. My Girl Josephine

    My Girl Josephine (1960)

    194 views

    "My Girl Josephine" is a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew. Domino recorded the song on Imperial Records (Imperial 5704) in 1960, and it charted #7 on the Billboard R&B charts and #14 on the Billboard pop charts.


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1960s R&B song stubs
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